canan dagdelen, libelluledae <br />
canan dagdelen, libelluledae <br />
canan dagdelen, libelluledae <br />
canan dagdelen, libelluledae <br />
canan dagdelen, libelluledae <br />
canan dagdelen, libelluledae <br />
 

canan dagdelen


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libelluledae



For Lunz am See the artist completed 800 clay dragonflies ('libellen' in German). These dragonflies appear once tightly crowded together and anchored in the ground, forming the German word 'lass' (let) in a meadow close to the lake. The other time they hover on thread in the Buda-Säge space, an adapted sawmill, and form the matrix dots depicting an upside down bridge.
The word 'lass' comes from one of the artist's streams of writing with which she attempts to approach thoughts, to capture associations and to deform. Now the progression of the chain of associations is passed on to the viewer – as with the bridge in the sawmill, too. Originally a widely recognised architectural set piece, the bridge loses its function through its inversion, and is able to open up new perspectives.
While the viewers are repeatedly tempted to make a closed image for themselves, the gaze oscillates continually between innumerable individual points. Solid forms dissolve, new insights are provided.
(Katrina Petter)